I think we've located the problem, all right

This pilot fish has spent the last couple decades writing custom applications to monitor processes for a global manufacturer.

"The service utilities I have written have been tweaked and improved over the past decade to the point that something would have to be really unusual for them not to work," says fish.

But something is clearly wrong after the company opens a small facility in India and hires a local technician to maintain the servers in the building and be the local eyes and ears of IT.

For a few months, everything runs trouble free. But then the tech begins sending emails to fish, reporting an issue with one of the utilities fish has written.

Fish responds, suggesting that the tech check his servers. The tech clearly doesn't like that -- he replies to fish in a condescending tone, detailing all the certifications he's obtained. Fish notices the tech has begun cc'ing their manager, too.

After a few more fruitless suggestions from fish that the tech double-check the servers for potential problems, the tech suggests that fish send his source code, so the tech can look it over and "locate the problem for you."

And that's the last straw. Fish connects to the server remotely when he knows the tech isn't there and does his own investigation. He makes snapshots of the screens and writes a long email to the tech -- with a copy to their manager.

"I pointed out that he had not updated his service packs," fish says.

"I included screenshots of a virus that was found by the AV software on the server but had never been dealt with.

"I asked, why was a company server hosting Minecraft?

"A few hours later, I received an 'I'll take care of these things' message from the tech -- and I never received another email from him until the day he quit."

Got a problem? Tell Sharky. Send me your true tale of IT life at sharky@computerworld.com. You'll snag a snazzy Shark shirt if I use it. Add your comments below, and read some great old tales in the Sharkives.

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