Tizen OS will power all future Samsung smart TVs

Samsung also launches new SSD that's smaller than a business card

Samsung SUHD JS9500

Samsung's JS9500 is powered by the open-source Tizen OS.

Credit: Samsung

LAS VEGAS -- Samsung didn't announce smartphones, tablets or smartwatches at International CES, but it did unveil a new smart, connected TV on Monday powered by the open-source Tizen operating system.

Samsung also said that all of its upcoming smart TVs will be powered by Tizen.

The move shows that Samsung is dedicated to the operating system, which it has used in other devices, including the Samsung Gear S smartwatch introduced last fall. Most of its smartphones remain on Android.

Samsung's move to Tizen in some products helps give the South Korean vendor an alternative to Android or other operating systems, and lessens Samsung's dependency on Google, analysts said.

The new Tizen-powered TV sports an 88-in. display and is called the JS9500. It features brilliant colors and darker blacks with new 4K Ultra High Definition quantum-dot technology that Samsung has dubbed SUHD. (The S doesn't stand for anything, although "Samsung" might be a good guess.) Pricing wasn't announced.

According to a statement from Samsung, Tizen provides its smart TVs with better connectivity and "gives developers a more robust and easier platform for creating new applications." It also means consumers will have access to a much broader range of smart TV content than before, Samsung said.

During a press event at CES, Samsung officials said connected, or smart, TVs are soaring in popularity. They said Tizen, with a Smart Hub, is faster and easier to use than other operating systems.

Also at the event, Samsung announced a variety of home appliances as well as a Portable SSD (Solid State Drive) T1 storage device that is smaller than a business card. It features sequential read/write speeds of up to 450Mbps. It would take just eight seconds to transfer a 3GB movie file.

The SSD will come in 250GB, 500GB and 1TB capacity sizes and is expected to launch later this month in 15 countries including the U.S. Pricing wasn't announced.

Why is Apple letting Macs rot on the tree?
View Comments
Join the discussion
Be the first to comment on this article. Our Commenting Policies