China did not hijack 15% of the Net, counters researcher

Routes versus traffic confuses media, says expert

Talk that China hijacked 15% of the Internet earlier this year is overblown, a researcher said today.

"There's been some confusion over routing versus traffic," Craig Labovitz, chief scientist at Arbor Networks, said in an interview today. "While maybe 10% to 15% of the routes to other peers may have been diverted, a lot of those routes didn't propagate."

Instead of the widely-reported 15%, Labovitz estimated that the actual amount of Internet traffic affected by the April 2010 incident was much lower, on the order of just 0.015%.

Labowitz was reacting to media reports, many of which he said got it wrong, on the disclosure this week by the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission that for 18 minutes on April 8, a significant portion of the Internet's destinations were routed through servers belonging to China Telecom.

The Commissions' report to Congress noted that the route redirection had affected U.S. government and military networks, as well as major U.S. commercial sites such as Microsoft's and Dell's.

"China Telecom advertised erroneous network traffic routes that instructed U.S. and other foreign Internet traffic to travel through Chinese servers," the report stated. "Other servers around the world quickly adopted these paths, routing all traffic to about 15% of the Internet's destinations through servers located in China."

But routes do not equal traffic, argued Labovitz.

"Think of it like a telephone book," said Labovitz. "A telephone book could have millions of phone numbers. Say 15% of those numbers are corrupted. But you have to ask how widely were those [corrupted] telephone books distributed."

Based on data from Arbor Networks' ATLAS (Active Threat Level Analysis System), Labovitz said that the amount of traffic through the hijacked routes was much, much smaller than 15%.

"There was no statistically significant increase in traffic [through China Telecom] due to the hijack," said Labowitz. "Most of the re-routing [propagation] didn't make it very far."

The Internet relies on a routing system where numerous servers exchange information with each other to determine the best path for traffic to take to a specific URL. The protocol that decides such routing is called Border Gateway Protocol, or BGP.

1 2 Page
FREE Computerworld Insider Guide: IT Certification Study Tips
Join the discussion
Be the first to comment on this article. Our Commenting Policies