Scot Finnie: The continuing evolution of Computerworld

On June 23, we will publish the last print issue of Computerworld.

It was 47 years ago, almost to the day, that Computerworld's very first issue rolled off the presses: June 21, 1967. The newspaper's first publisher was the late Patrick J. McGovern, who was the founder and chairman of International Data Group (IDG), Computerworld's parent company.

It's sad to lose anything that has endured so long. But we are merely taking part in the natural evolution of the media industry, like so many great publications before us. Trains, after all, were once powered by coal and steam; Computerworld is moving from paper to electrons.

Our talented editors will continue to create all the content that has until now appeared in the print publication, just as they always have. That includes coverage of enterprise technologies, careers and management, plus expert analysis and news. Our thriving Computerworld.com website, launched in 1996, is the primary home of our content. Due to space restraints, the printed edition represents a small subset of our overall editorial offering. There's a lot more to explore online.

To make it easier to navigate, we will be rolling out a significant redesign of Computerworld.com later this summer. The current site emphasizes news. One of our primary design goals is to make feature articles, opinions, special projects (such as our 100 Best Places to Work in IT package, which is featured in this issue) and other stories far more visible.

We're also developing something new for those who prefer to hold Computerworld in their hands. Grab your tablet (or laptop) and get ready to read the new Computerworld digital magazine. Beginning Aug. 1, we will email a digital magazine link to our print subscribers every month. The new digital edition will support touch and will be formatted for reading on tablet and desktop displays. The digital version will also be available for download, with registration, via Computerworld.com.

So let's bid a fond farewell to the paper-and-ink version of Computerworld. We'll miss it. But the people behind Computerworld are energized by the prospect of creating editorial content in new ways. That's sure to translate into good things.

Email me if you want to reminisce about Computerworld's first 47 years or have suggestions about what's to come: sfinnie@computerworld.com.

Scot Finnie is Computerworld's editor in chief. You can contact him at sfinnie@computerworld.com and follow him on Twitter (@ScotFinnie).

FREE Computerworld Insider Guide: Five IT certifications that won’t break you
Join the discussion
Be the first to comment on this article. Our Commenting Policies