New Verizon broadband router supports data and voice

Device could be taken on business trips to keep users connected to customers

Verizon Wireless today announced a new broadband router that works over its LTE network and allows voice and data connectivity for the home or small business.

The Verizon Wireless 4G LTE Broadband Router with Voice can also be useful for travel, such as business or personal trips. Plugged into a power source, the router provides Wi-Fi access to smartphones, tablets and other devices for a distance of up to 300 feet. Three Ethernet ports are available for wired connections to laptops and other devices.

Because the data connection is over LTE wireless, Verizon said data downloads will range from 5 Mbps to 12 Mbps, and will be available in 500 cities nationwide. Battery backup of up to four hours is provided in the event of a power outage.

A landline phone number also can be ported to the router. Keeping the same number could be more convenient for users and their business customers to remember. The router is made by Novatel Wireless, according to a Verizon spokesman.

Verizon normally charges up to $49.99 for the router with a two-year contract, or $199.99 with month-to-month service. In addition, voice and data service costs $30 a month, on top of a Share Everything service plan. For a limited time through the end of September, customers who purchase the voice and data plan can receive the router free with a two-year plan.

With a free router, a voice and data router plan for $30, and a Share Everything plan with two smartphones, one tablet and 4GB of shareable data a month, a customer would pay $190 a month, plus taxes and fees.

This article, New Verizon broadband router supports data and voice, was originally published at Computerworld.com.

Matt Hamblen covers mobile and wireless, smartphones and other handhelds, and wireless networking for Computerworld. Follow Matt on Twitter at @matthamblen or subscribe to Matt's RSS feed. His email address is mhamblen@computerworld.com.

See more by Matt Hamblen on Computerworld.com.

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