We DO trust users -- that's why we have failsafes

This company decides to give its board members iPads so they can receive and review reports and requests prior to each monthly meeting, says a pilot fish who's part of the project.

"The information emailed to each board member includes financial performance reports, future marketing news and information on specific employees," fish says. "In general, this is data that one would not want in the public sphere or in the wild."

The board members can also email each other about sensitive and confidential issues using the tablets. And to make that safer, each board member has been shown how to use an encrypted email function.

It's designed to be board-member friendly: Just type a particular short keyword in the subject line of the email to trigger encryption.

And the importance of keeping this business information secure is very clearly underlined by IT in the presentation to board members, so there shouldn't be any doubt in anyone's mind about how important this is.

But as a failsafe, the emails are also scanned before they're delivered, and if any personally identifiable information is noted, the email is automatically encrypted.

And the results of the effort? "Within a week, there was a growing exception log of the emails that had to be encrypted versus the user encrypting these prior to sending," groans fish.

"In the review of these exceptions, four of the six board members were not completing the simple task to encrypt. Their reasons ranged from forgetting to type the short keyword in, to somehow typing the simple keyword in incorrectly -- to not thinking it was that important."

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