The Docker container hype cycles into overdrive

docker.jpg

Here comes the 'production-ready' Docker 1.0.

Docker, Inc. announces its eponymous cloud container product. Based on the open-source project of the same name, the company claims it's now ready for prime time.

As if to prove it, they're offering support and an app store. All this and more is being shown off this week at Dockercon 14.

In IT Blogwatch, bloggers ponder the future of virtualization and hypervisors.

Your humble blogwatcher curated these bloggy bits for your entertainment.

 

It's a welcome return to Nancy Gohring (with fried egg): [And a not-so-welcome return to that joke -Ed.]

It's a big week for Docker, Inc. ... The first officially supported version of the open source containerization technology [is] graduat[ing] to serving traditional enterprises. ... Docker is also hosting its first annual conference this week.

Docker is an open-source technology that lets developers pull together all the components of an application...making it easy to move the app from development [into] production. Once the app is in the Docker container, it can also be easily moved between virtual machines, bare-metal servers, or clouds.

The company is also launching the Docker Hub Registry, which will include more than 14,000 apps that can easily be used in Docker containers. ... At launch, the Official Repository includes the top 15 most searched for applications, including Ubuntu, CentOS, Redis, and MySQL.  MORE

 

Ron Miller grinds grains of news: [Give it a rest -Ed.]

CEO Ben Golub said the announcements at the conference are the culmination of 15 months of frenzied work. ... Docker 1.0 is another product that takes advantage of containerization techniques developed by Google, in this case, providing a safe way to distribute applications without breaking them.

Traditionally, developers and operations have been at odds because developers wanted to make changes and operations wanted stability. ... With the guts of the program stored safely inside the Docker container, developers can change the inside and the outside always works consistently.  MORE

 

And Docker's Julien Barbier cuts to the chase: [Oh, shut up, Richi -Ed.]

After 15 months, 8,741 commits from more than 460 contributors, 2.75 million downloads, over 14,000 “Dockerized” apps, and feedback from 10s of 1000s of users...we’re excited to announce that it’s here: Docker 1.0. ... We celebrate with the entire Docker community, for without the community’s contributions, pull requests, and answering of each other’s questions...none of this would have been possible.

Thanks again to the entire Docker community for your contributions toward achieving Docker 1.0! We can’t wait to see what our collective efforts will result in during the next 15 months.  MORE

 

So Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols gets saucy: [Really? Really??? -Ed.]

Docker, Inc. [is] the commercial father to the open source Docker container project. ... Docker uses containers, in lieu of virtual machines, to enable multiple applications to be run at once on the same server.

The program is made up of the Docker Engine, its container standard, and Docker Hub, a cloud-based service for users, content and workflows.

Looking ahead, I see [containers] becoming vitally important in clouds and data centers. ... Containers enable you to place two to three times as many applications on a single server as virtualization allows you to.  MORE

 

But Ben Kepes keeps on looking for the money: [You're fired -Ed.]

There’s a funny thing with community-driven open source initiatives. They seem to generate lots of angst within the community. ... It is perhaps for the very reason that it was initiated by a tiny startup that Docker hasn’t suffered the same issues. [And] the interesting thing about Docker the initiative is that it is being spearheaded by Docker the company. And until now we’ve had no real clarity about how the commercial body will actually become revenue generating

Docker has had an amazing rise to fame over the past year. It will be interesting to watch the initiative mature and, closely tied to that, the success of Docker the business.  MORE

Computerworld Blogs Newsletter

Subscribe now to the Blogs Newsletter for a daily summary of the most recent and relevant blog posts at Computerworld.  

FREE Computerworld Insider Guide: Five IT certifications that won’t break you
Join the discussion
Be the first to comment on this article. Our Commenting Policies