Nokia uses F-word in Android X-citement

forking Android

Espoo attempts to develop developing markets.

In Nokia's last hurrah before Microsoft takes over, it's unveiled THREE Android-based phones. At Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, the Nokia X series is raising eyebrows, even though it's been widely leaked for months.

In IT Blogwatch, bloggers theorize and aggrandize.

Your humble blogwatcher curated these bloggy bits for your entertainment.

 

Natasha Lomas rips into shot:

More proof, if proof were needed, that Android won the smartphone OS wars.

...

Nokia’s Droidy new family was unveiled today...in Barcelona...known as the Nokia X. ... Nokia also announced the Nokia X+...and the Nokia XL. ... Stephen Elop describ[ed] the range as a “different but complementary...family that strengthens our affordable [devices] family. ... The Nokia X takes people to Microsoft’s cloud, not to Google’s.”

...

Bottom line: Nokia X is a Trojan horse stuffed with Microsoft services, pushed inside Android’s app-rich empire.  MORE

 

But, as Jean-Louis Gassée notes, "It's not that simple":

Nokia X can’t offer an entire Android stack — it can’t be allowed to compete with the higher-end Lumias...so it would have to run an “unmentionable” Android fork. ... This could give pause to software developers...“Where is Microsoft going with this? Won’t the Android beast...displace the Windows Phone OS?”

...

Microsoft...faces a dilemma: Lose the Asha...business to aggressive forked-Android makers, or risk poisoning its Windows Phone business. ... None of this draws a pretty picture for Microsoft’s mobile future. Damned if it introduces Android...damned if it lets that same software kill its Asha...business.

...

PS:..four years ago...Olli-Pekka Kallasvuo, the accountant cum attorney CEO...was replaced by a Microsoft alum who immediately Osborned Nokia’s smartphone business by pre-announcing the move to Windows Phone.  MORE

 

What about apps? Dan Rowinski X-plains:

X...won't come with access to the Google Play store...so how is Nokia going to woo developers?

...

Nokia...says that most existing Android apps should work. ... While U.S. users are accustomed to getting Android apps through the Google Play store, that’s not the case in many other parts of the world. ... The Nokia store...will feature Nokia's own selection array of apps. .... Nokia has a tool that will scan the app for compatibility, and says that most apps won't need to change a thing. ... Third-party app stores will be available as links.

...

Some will have to change certain features to tie them into Nokia/Microsoft services instead of Google's. ... Nokia will provide developers with a new location API to replace Google Maps. ... Nokia has its own custom-made notifications API that will also integrate into the phone's home screen. ... Nokia X will support [in-app] payments in every country that the phone is distributed to, often using direct-carrier billing.  MORE

 

So Alex Colon X-cretes the speeds 'n' feeds: [You're fired -Ed.]

The Nokia X is a 4-inch device with an 800 x 480 display...1GHz dual-core Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 MSM8225 processor...4GB of internal storage...microSD slot...3-megapixel camera on the back...1,500mAh battery...dual-SIM.

...

[It] transcends the bargain bin feel of many low-cost smartphones with a design reminiscent of Nokia’s high-end Lumia brand. ... A sturdy polycarbonate casing that you can...change for another color...just over 0.40 inches thick...comfortable to hold. ... Using the Nokia X feels slow. The heavily modified version of Android is not nearly as graceful as the always-swift Windows Phone.

...

The main selling point for the Nokia X...is its price...$122. [But] Nokia’s own, Windows-based Lumia 521 can be purchased for $99 or less. ... The Nokia X can afford to be cheaper.  MORE

 

Meanwhile, some guy calling himself Roku sounds slightly cynical:

Congrats to Nokia, they built a phone that neither Android nor Windows users like, they have done the impossible and united opposing factions.

...

Finally we no longer have to hear about how MS bought Nokia to stop them from making an Android phone or how Nokia would’ve been successful if they made Android phones.  MORE

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