That last setting is the hardest one to get right

User at a remote site calls this support pilot fish, asking for help to set up a wireless color printer.

Sure, fish tells her -- all I need is for your supervisor to send in a formal request via email. "Once I received the email from the supervisor, I called the user back to help with the printer installation," fish says.

"She provided the wireless printer model number and details of the wireless network. After a few minutes, the wireless printer was up and running."

Fish advises the user to place the printer within range of the wireless router or repeater, and warns that any large metal objects, including parts of the building, could interfere with the wireless signal.

But after a few printing tests, it all looks good. The user tells fish that two other users need to be able to print to this device, including her supervisor, so she adds the wireless printer to the other workstations and the supervisor's iPad with no problems.

User calls fish a hero, the ticket is closed, and everybody's happy.

"Two days went by," says fish. "Then I got a call from the supervisor at the remote site. He sounded quite upset because he couldn't print to the wireless color printer."

Fish runs through the troubleshooting checklist: Has the printer been moved? No. Were you able to print before? Yes, but then the printer disappeared from his iPad. Is the printer plugged into power? Yes. Can anyone else print to the printer? No.

Fish knows everything was working, and since it's a new printer it's unlikely to have broken down from wear and tear.

Can you check to see if the printer is turned on? he finally asks.

"There was silence for a few seconds," fish says. "Then the supervisor returned. 'Oops,' he said. 'Guess what? Now it works.'"

Turn on, tune in, and drop Sharky a line. Send me your true tale of IT life at sharky@computerworld.com. You'll score a sharp Shark shirt if I use it. Add your comments below, and read some great old tales in the Sharkives.

Get your daily dose of out-takes from the IT Theater of the Absurd delivered directly to your Inbox. Subscribe now to the Daily Shark Newsletter.

To express your thoughts on Computerworld content, visit Computerworld's Facebook page, LinkedIn page and Twitter stream.
Windows 10 annoyances and solutions
Shop Tech Products at Amazon
Notice to our Readers
We're now using social media to take your comments and feedback. Learn more about this here.