If off-and-on-again won't fix it, just replace it

This printer is still under warranty, so when it goes bad, an IT pilot fish calls the company that sold it.

"I explained to the service rep the NVRAM error on the machine that was causing the problems, and that we needed a replacement," says fish. "He asked me to go through some steps with him to see if it would fix the machine. So I complied, shutting off the printer and turning it back on again.

"Well, this guy was a PC tech and not one from the printer department. He told me to remove the drivers from the server. I knew this wouldn't fix the issue, especially after working with printers that have had errors on the main boards in the machines."

Fish points out that he's been working on both printers and computers for the last ten years.

Tech explains that he's been working on them just as long.

Fish asks if he can speak to a senior tech. Tech, in a snide tone, replies that he is a senior tech.

OK, says fish, then give me all the information that will show me how a board error on the machine would be fixed by me uninstalling the print drivers from the server -- and how about you email me all the support data from other clients who have had the same happen to them, after you remove the names?

I can't do that, tech says. Why not? fish demands. It's not on my system to access, tech says. Being a senior technician, you should be able give me all that information on how it applies, fish says.

"He told me to hold on so he could talk to his supervisors," fish says. "Then he came back on the phone and told me he was sending me over to printer support.

"As much as I hate saying it, I hate know-it-alls -- and I am one."

Sharky can't know your story until you send it. So tell me your true tale of IT life at sharky@computerworld.com. You'll get a stylish Shark shirt if I use it. Add your comments below, and read some great old tales in the Sharkives.

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