Sort of like a car designer who can't drive?

Big communications company has lots of network engineers whose job is designing both the company's internal networks and those of customers, reports an IT pilot fish working there.

"They're designing networks for companies of all sizes: small business to the largest enterprises," fish says.

"These engineers use an old system that's required for their workflow, and it needs to be set up via remote access. The easiest way for an IT analyst like me to access the engineer's machine and perform the setup is via the engineer's IP address.

"What is, um, interesting is that roughly 20 percent of the network engineers contacting me are unable to provide their IP addresses to me without my giving them instructions.

"How are they able to create a network plan that spans an enterprise without knowing how to identify their own locations on their own network?"

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