How was I supposed to know THAT?

This company is in the process of replacing all its BlackBerrys with iPhones, and an IT pilot fish on the firing line says the transition is moving along -- with the occasional glitches.

"I sent a new phone to a user, and as soon as he activated it, he was complaining that his new phone didn't work," says fish. "He couldn't hear anyone. The volume kept going down."

Fish isn't in her office, but she figures she should be able to troubleshoot this one pretty easily. She tells the user to turn the volume all the way up, and that seems to improve the situation.

But as they keep talking, the user tells fish that the volume is gradually dropping again.

Fish tries more troubleshooting, but nothing seems to help for long -- the phone just keeps getting quieter.

Eventually she tells the user that she wants to set up a conference call on a land line, linked with the carrier to see if they can get the phone replaced under warranty. She gives the user a specific time to call later that same day.

The appointed time comes. There's no call from the user. Fish sits waiting for a bit. No call. She proceeds to other tasks, but stays close to the phone in case it rings.

Two hours after the specified time, fish calls the user to ask why he didn't call.

His response? "Oh, we fixed it. It's fine now."

Puzzled, fish asks what did he do to fix it.

"This other user helped me," user says. "He showed me that there were pieces of plastic film on the front and back of the phone. We just removed them, and everything is working."

Sighs fish, "Yeah, plastic film -- which has tabs on the top, above the phone, to indicate that you should remove them."

Sharky wants to unwrap your story. Send me your true tale of IT life at sharky@computerworld.com. You'll score a sharp Shark shirt if I use it. Add your comments below, and read some great old tales in the Sharkives.

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