And all those passwords will end up the same, too

Work order comes in to IT to change a user's ID due to a name change, and this pilot fish gets the task -- well, part of the task, anyway.

"Our IT department, for whatever reason, determined to delegate the responsibilities for maintaining access to the different systems to different staff members," says fish. "Network access to the network staff, email and other software access to the applications staff and access to the iSeries to my co-worker and myself.

"So I went about copying her current setup to her new account, including a new password. Then I signed on to the system with her new account and new password to ensure that it worked. I then set the password to disabled, so she would have to change it the first time she signed on."

Finally, fish sends the user an email message, specifying in the subject line that this is for the iSeries access, specifying in the body that this is her new iSeries ID and closing with a note that, if she has any questions regarding her iSeries access, she should contact fish.

Soon after, fish gets an email from the user. She can't log in with the new user ID and password.

Fish knows it works, so he heads to her office to check on what she's doing.

First thing he notices when he walks in is that she's at the network login.

He stops her and has her use her current network login. After her desktop comes up, she's able to log into the iSeries with the new ID fish has provided.

Before leaving, he explains that she'll have to wait for the other staff to complete their tasks before her network and email accounts would be changed.

"I made her feel better by passing the problem off as an issue with our IT procedures -- which it partly was -- instead of blaming her for not reading her email carefully," fish says. "It's always good to keep the users on your side."

Sharky's on your side too. So help me out by sending me your true tale of IT life at sharky@computerworld.com. You'll score a sharp Shark shirt if I use it. Add your comments below, and read some great old tales in the Sharkives.

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