Say what?

Have you ever listened to doctors talk to each other about a patient? To me, they always seem to have their own language because of the acronyms they use. It's not only doctors. Acronyms are everywhere, in health care, in IT, in texting.  It's hard to have a conversation without them. 

Well, I was talking to a customer in the healthcare field the other day, and during that conversation I noticed something interesting.  If someone not technically savvy was listening in, I doubt they would understand even a third of what we were talking about. It came to me that the IT industry also uses a language of its own, mostly rooted in the use of three letter acronyms (TLA) - which makes it extremely difficult for even experienced IT pros to understand. 

As an example, here is a summary of the conversation. 

Hey Chris, maybe you can help. The IT OM was doing an IPL of an IBM P590, and the FC LUN ID in the DMX array was bad. We tried to do an ALSB to the LT05 backup to no avail.

I think the internal IB I/O link in the P590 was DOA. Anyway, we were also using the DMX to do SRDF over an FCiP WAN link to the DR. We tried to IPL at the DR, but the LUN assigned to the domain we were using as the remote IPL source was DOA. Obviously, we missed the RTO, and since we had to use a BCV to IPL, we also missed the RPO.

I think a better way would be to do a periodic snap at the source LUN, then SRDF that as the RBS. This way, we could assure a faster RTO and a better RPO, especially in a rolling disaster. What do you think?

Did you understand that? If you did, you are a true storage geek. Give yourself a high five. If not, don't worry, most normal people wouldn't either.

Here is the same conversation with all the acronyms spelled out. See if it makes it easier for you to follow. 

Hey Chris, maybe you can help. The information technology operations manager was doing an initial program load of an International Business Machines Corporation P590 (P590 is the model number of an International Business Machines Corporation server), and the Fibre Channel logical unit number identity in the direct matrix architecture array (DMX is an EMC storage model) was bad.

We tried to do an alternate load source boot to the LT05 (LT05 is the model number of a standard tape drive) backup to no availability. I think the internal Infiniband input output link in the P590 was dead on arrival. Anyway, we were also using the direct matrix architecture array to do synchronous remote data facility (this is a type of data replication) over a Fibre Channel over IP wide area network link to the disaster recovery location.

We tried to initial program load at the disaster recovery location, but the logical unit number assigned to the domain (A domain is a virtual server running within the physical server) we were using as the remote initial program load source was dead on arrival. Obviously, we missed the recovery time objective, and since we had to use a business continuance volume to initial program load, we also missed the recovery point objective.

I think a better way would be to do a periodic snapshot of the source data logical unit number, then synchronous remote data facility as the remote boot source. This way, we could assure a faster recovery time objective and a better recovery point objective, especially in a rolling disaster. What do you think?

Don't worry if you didn't understand that version either. Most people would need to do research just to understand some of the technical terms, like Infiniband.

I'm not sure if the use of three letter acronyms is arrogance on our part, or just that we love three letter acronyms,

but it seems to be getting worse instead of better as time goes on. The good news is that the current generation is actually used to this. Just look over the shoulder of someone texting a message. Do you know what LMAO, ILU, BRB, ROTFL, etc., mean? Can we all stop this madness and actually start spelling things out so we know what the heck each other is saying?!

Anyway, this is all getting me tired, so right now I think I'll just chill with an ICB (Ice Cold Beer), and catch some NFL (National Football Leage) reruns on my HDTV (High Definition Television).

Christopher Poelker is the author of Storage Area Networks for Dummies, and he is currently the vice president of Enterprise Solutions at FalconStor Software.

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